(Y) Dentida

I am a product of a society that does not want me, and my identity is the constant re-imagining of old constructs, living in the border space between who i want to be and who i am... i wish not to (re)cover my past, but heal the wounds to my future
tothedragonslair:

basedpidgeot:

feather-in-my-cap-and-cheese:

urbendisaster:

what?

The wheels take impact and stress off your legs, and the position helps your spine, but you’re still doing running motions instead of biking motions, so your legs are getting a good workout, and you can go for longer

nerdy shit aside, iamgine how sick it must be to just let those feet fly into the air and do superman poses down a highway

I want this I want this I want this I want this I want this I want this I want this I want this I want this I want this I want this

tothedragonslair:

basedpidgeot:

feather-in-my-cap-and-cheese:

urbendisaster:

what?

The wheels take impact and stress off your legs, and the position helps your spine, but you’re still doing running motions instead of biking motions, so your legs are getting a good workout, and you can go for longer

nerdy shit aside, iamgine how sick it must be to just let those feet fly into the air and do superman poses down a highway

I want this I want this I want this I want this I want this I want this I want this I want this I want this I want this I want this

(Source: cute-decoration)

c4ctus:

chazzfox:

cijithegeek:

kyssthis16:

yeezysdisciple:

youngbertreynolds:

thempress:



Maybe put it on a canvas instead of someone’s property, and we can all be happy.

who paying for these canvases or the art programs so these kids can have that? Why should it matter if these run down buildings that never get fixed up anyway get graffiti’d? 

Therein lies the issue. Art programs, both visual and performance based, are the first programs to be cut. Canvas ain’t cheap. Neither are the supplies. Much of the graffiti that takes place IS on buildings that are run down. The gov’t didn’t place any value on these properties and yet get pissy with dudes “vandalizing” their shit. You can’t have it both ways, ya dig. 

My father was a garment contractor in LA. In the late 80s, he owned the building where he had his factory. He thought it would be a cool idea to commission local graffiti artists, usually young Black and Latino men looking to stay out of trouble, to paint murals on his buildings. After all, he runs a garment design/manufacturing company, and creative signage is great advertising.
One day, he showed up to the building and the city just painted over the murals without permission or notice.
First, the city told him he couldn’t have graffiti art on HIS building because it brought down property value. After he complained, then they said: ok you can do this, but you need a permit. After he got the permit, then the city said: ok, but you can only use these artists.  Of course, these artists were all White graphic design students from USC, and of course they charged 3x more.
There is a prejudice against this type of art, and it’s racial.  Banksy vandalizes folks buildings all the time, and folks treat him like the Messiah. He ain’t doing nothing new that Black and Brown folks haven’t done for decades.

This whole post…I just find it really interesting! And sad, too, but good thing to read.

I personally enjoy seeing street art such as graffiti. It’s beautiful.

c4ctus:

chazzfox:

cijithegeek:

kyssthis16:

yeezysdisciple:

youngbertreynolds:

thempress:

image

Maybe put it on a canvas instead of someone’s property, and we can all be happy.

who paying for these canvases or the art programs so these kids can have that? Why should it matter if these run down buildings that never get fixed up anyway get graffiti’d? 

Therein lies the issue. Art programs, both visual and performance based, are the first programs to be cut. Canvas ain’t cheap. Neither are the supplies. Much of the graffiti that takes place IS on buildings that are run down. The gov’t didn’t place any value on these properties and yet get pissy with dudes “vandalizing” their shit. You can’t have it both ways, ya dig. 

My father was a garment contractor in LA. In the late 80s, he owned the building where he had his factory. He thought it would be a cool idea to commission local graffiti artists, usually young Black and Latino men looking to stay out of trouble, to paint murals on his buildings. After all, he runs a garment design/manufacturing company, and creative signage is great advertising.

One day, he showed up to the building and the city just painted over the murals without permission or notice.

First, the city told him he couldn’t have graffiti art on HIS building because it brought down property value. After he complained, then they said: ok you can do this, but you need a permit. After he got the permit, then the city said: ok, but you can only use these artists.  Of course, these artists were all White graphic design students from USC, and of course they charged 3x more.

There is a prejudice against this type of art, and it’s racial.  Banksy vandalizes folks buildings all the time, and folks treat him like the Messiah. He ain’t doing nothing new that Black and Brown folks haven’t done for decades.

This whole post…I just find it really interesting! And sad, too, but good thing to read.

I personally enjoy seeing street art such as graffiti. It’s beautiful.

(Source: vandalslife, via sabor-a-psycho)

lareinaana:

lezzieknope:

my hopes for season two of orange is the new black:

  • less piper
  • more everyone else

the quick n swift disintegration of pornstache…

(via mothsfly)